2014-02-11 13:28:25 UTC

Improving Celiac Disease Risk Prediction by Testing Additional Non-HLA Variants

Feb. 13, 2014

Publishing in Gut, Jihane Romanos and colleagues find that predicting risk with 57 additional non-HLA variants, in addition to HLA variants, improves the identification of potential celiac disease patients.

The majority of celiac disease patients are not being properly diagnosed and therefore remain untreated, leading to a greater risk of developing celiac-associated complications. The major genetic risk heterodimer, HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8, is already used clinically to help exclude disease. However, approximately 40 percent of the population carries these alleles and the majority never develop celiac disease. Reporting in Gut, Jihane Romanos and colleagues find that predicting risk with 57 additional non-HLA variants improves the identification of potential celiac disease patients. This demonstrates a possible role for combined HLA and non-HLA genetic testing in diagnostic work for celiac disease.

Gut 2014: 63: 415-422

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