2013-04-23 14:30:02 UTC

Levels of Anti-tTG During Pregnancy Are Associated with Reduced Fetal and Birth Weight

April 25, 2013

Jessica C. Kiefte–de Jong and colleagues report in Gastroenterology that high levels of antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG), a marker of celiac disease, during pregnancy cause reduced fetal weight and birth weight. Results were intensified for those carrying HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8.

Celiac disease in pregnant women has been associated with poor growth of the fetus, but little is known about how the level of celiac disease affects fetal growth or birth outcomes. Jessica C. Kiefte–de Jong and colleagues assessed the associations between levels of antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG), a marker of celiac disease, and fetal growth and birth outcomes for pregnant women. Publishing in Gastroenterology, the researchers conclude that levels of anti-tTG in pregnant women are inversely associated with fetal growth. Growth was reduced to the greatest extent in fetuses of women with the highest levels of anti-tTG (>6 U/mL). Birth weight was also reduced in women with intermediate levels of anti-tTG (0.8 to ≤6 U/mL) and further reduced in those carrying HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8.

Gastroenterology 2013: 144(4), 726-735.e2

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