2014-07-31 19:03:58 UTC

Public Comment on Draft Research Plan: Screening for Celiac Disease

Aug. 7, 2014

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is seeking comment on a new draft research plan that provides guidance for future celiac screening studies.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) released a new draft research plan that provides guidance for future celiac screening studies and is soliciting public comment on the proposal until Aug. 27, 2014.  

The research plan proposes a systematic and ongoing emphasis on reviewing the following issues: 

  • The effectiveness of both targeted and universal screening across populations.
  • Harms and accuracy of screening tests.
  • Harms associated with treatment.
  • Whether screening-detected treatment of celiac performs better than no treatment or treatment after clinical diagnosis.  

Performance measures would include consideration of morbidity, mortality and quality of life. Researchers will also look at prevalence.  

In addition to a statement of topics and questions, the research plan contains a basic analytic framework, which demonstrates the path and role of patients and screening throughout the process. The framework incorporates interventions, outcomes, comparators and study designs.

The draft research plan is available for review and public comment from July 31 through Aug. 27, 2014. To review the draft research plan and submit comments, go to www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/tfcomment.htm

More on Celiac Disease

Course for APPs benefits all experience levels

April 16, 2018

AGA's popular course for advanced practice providers will take place Aug. 10 through 12 in Chicago, Illinois.

APPs: Enhance your delivery of patient care

March 28, 2018

AGA's popular course for advanced practice providers will be held this summer in Chicago.

HLA-DQ–Gluten Tetramer Blood Test Accurately Identifies Patients With and Without Celiac Disease in Absence of Gluten Consumption

March 1, 2018

An HLA-DQ–gluten tetramer based assay that detects gluten-specific T cells accurately identifies patients with and without celiac disease, regardless of whether the individuals are on a gluten-free diet.